Meet the Woman Behind a $2 Million Superfood Business Helping Women Farmers in Africa

With the energy boost came the realization that raising moringa as a crop could not only improve local nutrition but also provide sustainable livelihoods. To fulfill that vision, Curtis and three colleagues started Kuli Kuli to sell moringa-based energy bars and shots, herbal tea, and powder supplements. “I knew that introducing moringa to the U.S. market was a venture that would be successful,” she says. “I just wanted to make sure it was done in a way that helps support women moringa farmers around the world.”
https://www.inc.com/magazine/201809/bill-saporito/2018-inc5000-kuli-kuli-foods.html

Life After Amazon: Why Whole Foods Will Not Become a ‘Conventional Grocery Store’

It is difficult to overstate the importance of Whole Foods to a generation of natural food and product startups. In the early 1990s, the retailer was instrumental in transforming a sleepy industry comprising dreary mom-and-pops into a $50-plus billion colossus incorporating eye-pleasing design and head-spinning variety. It also emerged as an essential bridge to the mass market. Ask an organic food entrepreneur about the watershed moment when she knew her business would succeed. More often than not she’ll respond: the day I got into Whole Foods.
https://www.inc.com/leigh-buchanan/some-vendors-still-love-whole-foods.html

Kuli Kuli: A superstar of superfoods

Nestled in downtown Oakland, California, sustainable food and agriculture startup Kuli Kuli has roots more than 7,000 miles away. Founder Lisa Curtis was introduced to the moringa tree while serving as a Peace Corps volunteer in a small town in Niger. A vegetarian whose local diet consisted mainly of millet and rice, Curtis was able to curb her malnourishment, a lack of protein and key vitamins by adding moringa to her daily regime. Her health turnaround sparked an interest in introducing the benefit of the moringa plant to North American eaters.
https://www.greenbiz.com/article/kuli-kuli-superstar-superfoods

What Does Entrepreneurship Mean in Other Cultures? I Found Out

In the hot plains of Chinandega, Nicaragua, Julio MonteAlegre and his workers are planting moringa. A superfood that is well known in Nicaragua but still growing in popularity in the United States. The crop is driving Julio’s company, Esentium, to create more impact for his local community of El Viejo.
https://real-leaders.com/entrepreneurship-mean-cultures-found/

Meet Moringa, The Most Nutrient-dense Plant on The Planet

Kuli Kuli’s founder, Lisa Curtis, got her first taste of moringa as a Peace Corps volunteer in a small village in Niger. As a vegetarian, she was eating mostly rice and millet — a diet that left her feeling sluggish. When she mentioned her fatigue to women at the community health center, they suggested she try moringa. After buying the leaves from a neighbor’s tree, she mixed them with a popular peanut snack, called kuli-kuli, and noticed her health improve.
https://real-leaders.com/meet-moringa-the-most-nutrient-dense-plant-on-the-planet/

A Startup Backed By Kellogg’s VC Arm, Kuli Kuli, Introduces Americans To A New Superfood, Moringa

When Lisa Curtis was a Peace Corps volunteer in Niger, she discovered moringa, a green with high nutritional content that’s popular in Africa and elsewhere. When she returned to the United States, she decided to start a company that would introduce it to U.S. consumers – and provide better incomes to farmers in Africa.
https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbestreptalks/2017/10/05/a-startup-backed-by-kelloggs-vc-arm-kuli-kuli-introduces-americans-to-a-new-superfood-moringa/#37110f64e06d

THIS SUPER GREEN IS A STRONGER ANTI-INFLAMMATORY THAN TURMERIC

Grown on trees in regions of Africa, South America, and India, the super green is typically ground up and used in powder form, and it’s becoming an increasingly popular ingredient in bottled juices and bars. “Interest has been growing around greens in general, such as with smoothies or kale, and I think moringa is becoming a trending ingredient because people are looking for ways to get the most nutrient-dense [green] they can,” says Lisa Curtis, founder of Kuli Kuli, America’s leading moringa supplier.
https://www.wellandgood.com/good-food/health-benefits-of-moringa/

Three Organic, Fair-Trade Alternatives to Coffee

Kuli Kuli sources its moringa from Ghana, Haiti, and Nicaragua. In many nations, those included, the green-leafed plant is considered a weed, only eaten by those occupying the poorest societal rung.
https://www.sierraclub.org/sierra/green-life/three-organic-fair-trade-alternatives-coffee

Axios Impact Investment Interview

Peacefully indomitable may sound like an oxymoron, but that is exactly how I would describe Aaron & Abigail Sebesta’s calm but determined attitude and presence. Immediately intrigued by their life stories they spoke about during our house hunting together, I wasn’t surprised when less than a year later they took a huge step in pursuing their dream of moving to South America to help farmers finance their operations. Now in Cusco, Peru, their business–Axios Impact Investments–is embarking on a true social enterprise mission to solve one of the world’s biggest problems.
https://thatsdurangoblog.wordpress.com/axios-impact-investment-interview/?fbclid=IwAR3UDc6cThCUAjx36oQJSRigsniHT1TuI-IW2LeNZr_fg86RCo5MpDlffJU

PITAYA Plus outlines mission to turn America’s smoothies hot pink

It’s flaming pink, packed with fiber and magnesium, fruity, but not too sweet, and growing like crazy in the frozen smoothie pack market, says Chuck Casano, who is on a mission to do for Pitaya what Sambazon did for açai berries and KonaRed is doing for coffee fruit: turn something many Americans have never heard of into a household name.
https://www.foodnavigator-usa.com/Article/2015/09/17/PITAYA-Plus-outlines-mission-to-turn-America-s-smoothies-hot-pink