How Ecopreneurs Alleviate Poverty in Africa

With African populations projected to continually increase over the upcoming decades, waste production and management will equally be an increasing area of concern. Uncollected or improperly managed waste is a public health concern as it causes diseases and environmental degradation from the polluted land and water. Only 40 percent of waste is generally collected by the government in Nigeria, and, of that, only 13 percent is recycled.
https://www.borgenmagazine.com/how-ecopreneurs-alleviate-poverty-in-africa/

Qwenu’s top companies changing Africa | Wecyclers: disrupting waste recycling in Nigeria

Bilikiss Adebiyi-Abiola, the founder and Chief Executive Officer of Wecyclers has created a new narrative in Nigeria’s recycling industry. The social enterprise came with a long-needed model for waste collection, enabling it to record massive growth and impact within a very short while.
https://qwenu.com/2019/05/17/qwenus-top-companies-changing-africa-wecyclers-disrupting-waste-recycling-in-nigeria/

Wecyclers Wins €200,000 Prize In Waste Management

Wecyclers, a Lagos-Based waste recycling company founded by Mrs Bilikiss Adebiyi-Abiola in 2012, has won the 2019 King Baudouin African Development Prize worth €200,000 (N104 million) for its development work in Africa.Herve Lisoir, Coordinator Africa and Developing countries, King Baudouin Foundation, told newsmen on Wednesday that Wecyclers won the prize for its contribution to solving waste management problems not only in Nigeria but Africa.

https://naijabizcom.com/2019/05/02/wecyclers-wins-e200000-prize-in-waste-management/

Unilever gives N18m grant for waste management

The grant-cum-partnership will allow Unilever trade carbon footprints from its operations by helping to prevent the emission of C02 caused by improper disposal of its post-consumer waste products.
https://www.dailytrust.com.ng/unilever-gives-n18m-grant-for-waste-management.html

Making wealth from recycling

Sometimes she gets truckloads of plastics from collectors. The next step is to get them sorted, packaged and ready to go into the marketplace. This is because there are many companies looking for them. For her, local landfill waste collection is only the beginning of a recycling cycle.
http://thenationonlineng.net/making-wealth-recycling

Amazons turning waste to wealth

On her return to Lagos, she confronted a city with a major waste management crisis, producing 10,000 tonnes of refuse daily, much of which clog the city streets and leaches chemicals into the soil and groundwater.
http://thenationonlineng.net/amazons-turning-waste-wealth/

Tech Female Spotlight: Bilikiss Adebiyi-Abiola; CEO Wecyclers

The idea for Wecyclers was developed while I was in the US as a student at the MIT Sloan School of Management, following a five-year career as a corporate software engineer at IBM. I was assigned to a study project to help people at the bottom of the pyramid (people living on less than $2 a day), i decided to work on waste with focus on its uses, collection and processing.
http://smileandmobile.com/2015/10/29/tech-female-spotlight-bilikiss-adebiyi-abiola-ceo-wecyclers/

20 Global Startups That Are Changing The World

The goal of Nigeria’s only recycling venture is two-fold: to provide value for trash for low-income households, and to raise awareness about the importance of recycling. The latter includes not just the environmental benefits but goes to social welfare, too, in terms of pollution and disease reduction. Wecyclers builds and manages a fleet of low-cost cargo bikes to transport the incentive-based household recyclables to collection hubs. The materials are sorted and then sold to Nigerian recyclers. “Beyond the empowerment of people through efficient use of waste,” writes Wecyclers founder and CEO Bilikiss Adebiyi-Abiola, “we have also found out there is an increasing need for recycling on a larger scale in Nigeria. Nigeria can be said to be at a virgin state in recycling, as very little has been done compared to the volumes of recyclable materials generated and the progress made by other developing states. To this end, we have a resolve to push the recycling agenda in Nigeria.”
https://www.currencyfair.com/blog/20-startups-changing-the-world/

22 of the Most Fascinating Social Good Startups Changing the World

Wecyclers gives low-income communities in developing countries a chance to capture value from waste and clean up their neighborhoods through incentive-based recycling. “Since August 2012, Wecyclers has registered over 7,000 households for our collection service, built 25 operational collection cargo bikes and collected over 800 metric tons of recyclable materials,” says co-founder and CEO Bilikiss Adebiyi-Abiola.
https://thedailybanter.com/2015/06/22-of-the-most-fascinating-social-good-startups-changing-the-world/

Recycling waste can create 500,000 jobs in Nigeria – Wecyclers CEO, Bilikis

Many of our customers are living in abject poverty and they love the incentives. Sometimes they say, “can I use my points to get a house, or a car,” but I tell them this might take you a lot of years of recycling! For some of these people their immediate problem is not waste, it’s survival. They aren’t thinking about “the environment”, and so the best way to train them is to incentivize them.What kind of impact could Wecyclers potentially have?

http://www.theafricareport.com/West-Africa/recycling-waste-can-create-500000-jobs-in-nigeria-wecyclers-ceo-bilikis.html